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Getting started

The Automotive SIG manages several artifacts:

  • Automotive Stream Distribution (AutoSD): This project is a binary distribution developed within the SIG that is a public, in-development preview of the upcoming Red Hat In-Vehicle Operating System (OS).
  • RPM repositories: These are RPM repositories produced by the Automotive SIG to enhance AutoSD. New packages or features can be developed and hosted there to expand the capabilities of the AutoSD.
  • Sample images: These are images built with OSBuild using packages from the AutoSD, the Automotive SIG repositories, or other sources. They are examples of how to use AutoSD.

AutoSD

Similar to the upstream-downstream relationship between CentOS Stream and Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), AutoSD is an upstream repository for Red Hat In-Vehicle OS.

Automotive Stream Distribution vs CentOS Stream

AutoSD is a binary Linux distribution based on CentOS Stream, but with a some divergences. For example, AutoSD relies on the kernel-automotive package rather than the CentOS Stream kernel package.

The community, customers, and partners can explore AutoSD to see what will land in Red Hat In-Vehicle OS. Like CentOS Stream, AutoSD is open to contributions using similar mechanisms.

Installing QEMU

To run AutoSD virtual machines (VMs), you must install a QEMU machine emulator on your system. QEMU is supported on a variety of operating systems. If your operating system is not listed here, or for more information about QEMU, see Download QEMU.

Note

The example commands in this procedure call x86_64 architecture components. If you prefer to use an AArch64 architecture, replace qemu-system-x86 with qemu-system-arm in the commands of these procedures.

Installing QEMU on AutoSD, CentOS Stream, Fedora Linux, or RHEL

Prerequisites

A machine running AutoSD, CentOS Stream, Fedora, or RHEL

Procedure

  • Install QEMU:
    $ sudo dnf install qemu-system-x86
    

Installing QEMU on Ubuntu

Prerequisites

  • A machine running Ubuntu

Procedure

  • Install QEMU:
    $ sudo apt-get install qemu-system-x86
    

Installing QEMU on MacOS

Prerequisites

  • A machine running MacOS
  • Homebrew installed

Procedure

  • Install QEMU:
    brew install qemu
    

Installing QEMU on Windows

Prerequisites

  • A machine running 64-bit Windows 8.1 or later
  • pacman package manager from MSYM2 installed

Procedure

  • Install QEMU:
    pacman -S mingw-w64-ucrt-x86_64-qemu
    

Using pre-built images

All pre-built AutoSD images can be found in the: nightly repo. The repo features both x86_64 and aarch64 architecture images.

To explore the sample images, see sample images.

Running a developer QEMU image

The developer image has extra storage compared to other images.

Note

The example commands in this procedure call x86_64 architecture images. If you prefer to use AArch64 architecture images, replace x86_64 with aarch64 in the commands of this procedure.

Procedure

  1. Use grep to retrieve the exact name of the developer image:
$ AUTOSD_IMAGE_NAME="$(curl https://autosd.sig.centos.org/AutoSD-9/nightly/sample-images/ | grep -oE 'auto-osbuild-qemu-autosd9-developer-regular-x86_64-[0-9]+\.[A-Za-z0-9]+\.qcow2\.xz' | head -n 1)"

Note

This step is necessary, because images are uploaded every day using unique build IDs, which causes the name of the image to change slightly on a daily basis.

  1. Download the developer QEMU image with wget:
$ wget \
-O auto-osbuild-qemu-autosd9-developer-regular-x86_64.qcow2.xz \
https://autosd.sig.centos.org/AutoSD-9/nightly/sample-images/$AUTOSD_IMAGE_NAME
  1. Decompress the developer image using xz:
xz -d auto-osbuild-qemu-autosd9-developer-regular-x86_64.qcow2.xz
  1. Run the image with the qemu-system CLI:
$ /usr/bin/qemu-system-x86_64 \
-drive file=/usr/share/OVMF/OVMF_CODE.fd,if=pflash,format=raw,unit=0,readonly=on \
-drive file=/usr/share/OVMF/OVMF_VARS.fd,if=pflash,format=raw,unit=1,snapshot=on,readonly=off \
-smp 20 \
-enable-kvm \
-m 2G \
-machine q35 \
-cpu host \
-device virtio-net-pci,netdev=n0 \
-netdev user,id=n0,net=10.0.2.0/24,hostfwd=tcp::2222-:22 \
-drive file=auto-osbuild-qemu-autosd9-developer-regular-x86_64.qcow2,index=0,media=disk,format=qcow2,if=virtio,snapshot=off
  1. Log in using “root/password” as the default username/password.

Building your own developer QEMU images

Extend the base operating system beyond the capabilities of the pre-built images by building your own developer image. Use images from the sample-images repository as a starting point.

The osbuild-manifests directory in sample-images contains OSBuild manifest files, indicated by the mpp.yml extension. The mpp.yml files contain instructions, or OSBuild stages, that create new OS images.

The naming convention for image files is: $distro-$target-$image_type-$os_itype.$arch.$file_type.

See this file name as an example:

autosd-qemu-developer-regular.x86_64.qcow2

  • distro: autosd
  • target: qemu
  • image_type: developer
  • os_type: regular
  • arch: x86_64
  • file_type: qcow2

The mpp.yml files are organized in the distro, include and images folders. The osbuild-manifests directory also contains a Makefile that streamlines the image building process.

Prequisites

  • A Fedora/CentOS/RHEL system
  • OSBuild osbuild tooling

For more information about tools for building images, see Building images.

Procedure

  1. Clone the sample-images repository:
$ git clone https://gitlab.com/CentOS/automotive/sample-images
  1. Navigate to the osbuild-manifests directory:
$ cd sample-images/osbuild-manifests/
  1. Explore the different types of images that you can build:
$ make list-targets

Note

The output of the make list-targets command is quite extensive. Use grep to narrow your search.

  1. Optional: Filter the command output:
make list-targets | grep developer
  1. Build an image using an existing manifest:
$ sudo make autosd-qemu-developer-regular.x86_64.qcow2

Note

The above command invokes osbuild, which must be run as the root user.

  1. After the build succeeds, run the generated qcow2 image:
./runvm autosd-qemu-developer-regular.x86_64.qcow2

Note

Run ./runvm -h to check all available options for that command.


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